Will GO crack when prints are cold mounted?


#1

Has anyone tried cold mounting prints that have been coated with gloss optimizer? When varnishing prints with Print Shield, we usually wait until after the print has been mounted before spraying the Print Shield varnish. I was told some of the spray varnishes dry hard and can be brittle, and the pressure of the rollers could crack the varnish…I’m curious if GO would present the same potential problem.


#2

I am curious about this as well, so would appreciate feedback from anyone who has tried mounting Piezography gloss prints. I am unsure how the GO coating will respond, but believe it will act the same as Piezography inks.

While the inks are very stable, papers are sensitive to outgasing from such a wide source of materials that we do not advise mounting with glues or dry-mount, etc. We try to practice archival mounting as would museums do with works of art on paper. These are not traditional photographs, but rather pigment ink on paper. The one caveat is that the paper has a proprietary coating that the manufacturer guards - so it’s not readily know what all the chemical ingredients are. We just know that they can discolor when exposed to certain materials such as plastic, steel, rubber, and to fumes from a variety of glues and adhesives.

Happy printing~ Dana :slight_smile:


#3

I just remembered that we mounted some Piezography glossy prints a few years ago! They went through fine. It was one 30"x 40" (aluminum) and the other 43 x 60" (Dibond). We printed them on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag Pearl. I don’t know how you’d frame something that large without mounting…seems like it would shift around or slide in the frame…the big print was quite heavy!

[QUOTE=Dana-IJM;5027]I am curious about this as well, so would appreciate feedback from anyone who has tried mounting Piezography gloss prints. I am unsure how the GO coating will respond, but believe it will act the same as Piezography inks.

While the inks are very stable, papers are sensitive to outgasing from such a wide source of materials that we do not advise mounting with glues or dry-mount, etc. We try to practice archival mounting as would museums do with works of art on paper. These are not traditional photographs, but rather pigment ink on paper. The one caveat is that the paper has a proprietary coating that the manufacturer guards - so it’s not readily know what all the chemical ingredients are. We just know that they can discolor when exposed to certain materials such as plastic, steel, rubber, and to fumes from a variety of glues and adhesives.

Happy printing~ Dana :)[/QUOTE]


#4

Excellent, thanks for your feedback! Do you know what process/materials you used to mount the prints?