Fantastic Results

piezography

#1

I’ve started using Piezography K7 N B&W inks, and wanted to offer some feedback on my experience to date – for what it’s worth.

It’s a big decision to depart your OEM ink set and install a set of new inks remotely (I mean in Australia) with no real ability to test results before the expense (there is no local user group).

As a dedicated B&W digital photographer, no doubt the Epson ABW system is very good (I have a 3880), but could be improved. While Piezohgraphy may claim a capability to print as good as old silver halide, seeing is believing.

In terms of installing the system:

  1.     Everything went in as advised in the technical documentation. I followed the complete route (including a Piezoflush complete clean before installation).
    
  2.     Without trying to jinx myself, all the electronics on the printer continued to work, printer head is working fine, and ink is flowing in the printer’s veins.
    
  3.     QTR works fine – I can’t comment on whether it can be improved.
    
  4.     Technical support is great.
    

The inks are fantastic. While there is still a huge learning curve in terms of what can be done with the various shades and different papers, results for example on the Canson Baryta Photographique are huge. I printed on a sheet Canson Photo Gloss Premium RC 270 gsm (used the Baryta profile), and what Piezography says about the comparison with silver halide prints is true. The result is amazing - I believe it takes the 3880 to a new level of performance. While I’ve struggled with the Hahnemuhle Photo Rag due to soft proofing issues, I pulled off a print that gave me beautiful deep tonal values not possible, I believe, with the OEM inks. Of course the 3880 IMHO is a great printer, and right up to the task.


#2

Thank you for the wonderful and detailed review, we are very happy to hear your excitement with Piezography, and overall satisfaction with our company.
Please let us know if you have questions or there’s anything else we can help you with.

Best regards and happy printing~ Dana :slight_smile:


#3

Hi

I too, have just started with Piezography and have only been printing for a couple of days. I am also using Canson Baryta Photographique and was wondering what profile (curve?) you are using? I do not see it in the 3800/3880 list but found one in the K3 list - is that the correct one to use?

Thanks
William


#4

Hi William~

Piezography glossy curves can be found here: http://www.inkjetmall.com/tech/content.php?158-Piezography-K7-GLOSSY-Curve-Resource

Best regards and happy printing~ Dana :slight_smile:


#5

Hey jerrab, that makes at least two Aussies trying out Piezography, and you re a couple of years ahead of me! Any idea of how to check linearization without access to an i-one? I have the display version, which can’t do the tasks.


#6

The count is considerably higher than two.


#7

Great to hear! Please let this newbie know where the rest are lurking…I’m 400km south of Perth. Any help with my linearization dilemma?


#8

Most of the ones that I know about are over here on the east coast.

I have seen a tutorial for creating a QTR curve (note, not a Piezography curve, but a regular QTR curve for three blacks) using a scanner. Not something that I’ve tried. I guess you could print and scan a 21 step chart, convert to LAB, read the L values in Photoshop and plot them for a very rough indication, but rough would be the operative term. As far as I understand it, this procedure wouldn’t result in measurements that you could use to create a soft-proof ICC or to relinearise the curve. All it would do is show that they lie on a straight line. Again not something that I’ve tried. A Munki is cheaper than an i1.


#9

[QUOTE=Mike Lyons;9652]Great to hear! Please let this newbie know where the rest are lurking…I’m 400km south of Perth. Any help with my linearization dilemma?[/QUOTE]

It is possible by post, but long winded as it requires one print to linearise and another to verify. I can scan them for you, but I’m in Sydney.


#10

[QUOTE=Brian_S;9658]Most of the ones that I know about are over here on the east coast.

I have seen a tutorial for creating a QTR curve (note, not a Piezography curve, but a regular QTR curve for three blacks) using a scanner. Not something that I’ve tried. I guess you could print and scan a 21 step chart, convert to LAB, read the L values in Photoshop and plot them for a very rough indication, but rough would be the operative term. As far as I understand it, this procedure wouldn’t result in measurements that you could use to create a soft-proof ICC or to relinearise the curve. All it would do is show that they lie on a straight line. Again not something that I’ve tried. A Munki is cheaper than an i1.[/QUOTE]

O.K. I have found a link on how to use a Color Munki to make soft proof profiles. So would the Color Munki be accurate enough for linearization? I have one of these.


#11

I believe so, but I’ve not used one. IJM may be able to comment.


#12

The Munki is a good device. So you should be able to make excellent L measurements from it, then organize the data from it into the form that the .iquad linearization droplet requires or the Create ICC droplet requires.


#13

Needless to say, it would need to be a ColorMunki Photo, and not just a ColorMunki Display.

P.s. Out of interest, will a Munki read the standard 21x4, and if not, which chart would you print? Which software would you use to make the L measurements?