Eizo CG241W best settings


#1

Hi, ok had done some reading and believe the best setting piezography printing are.

80cmd
White point 500k
Gamma 2.2

Thing is there are number of other setting in the colour edge profile creator.

Have created a new profile with following settings.


Gamet = AdobeRGB
Gamet clipping = off (is this correct?)

Brightness = 80cmd

White Point = 500k

Set the target black = unset (is this correct? if not what to set it to)

Tone Curve = 2.20
All RGB = Set
Priority = Standard

So as i understand this is the profile i would use after i have converted image to black and white?

What is the correct monitor profile workflow?

Is it something like:

Convert raw file and complete any retouching, this done in AdobeRGB/ProPhoto monitor profile.

Convert to B&W and switch to Piezography monitor profile to complete editing.

Or would you just use the Piezography monitor profile from start to finish?

I take it that if was doing work that was not going to be for piezography print i would just use AdobeRGB/ProPhoto monitor profile.

thanks

PS now i have the CG241W i can see all the numbers on rgb check when viewed in PS :slight_smile:


#2

This is not a profile that you use at all. This is purely a profile that your operating system uses in reference to the calibration of your Eizo using the Eizo Color Navigator software. Your operating system loads this for use in communicating to the display.

Your images can be converted to grayscale but must be converted using the Gamma 2.20 profile and you can see how to setup Photoshop to do this in this small movie here: http://www.piezography.com/PiezoPress/easy-to-use/

Never use ProPhoto profiles unless you wish to image in a theoretical workspace that is too large for any printing system that uses pigment or dye ink. ProPhoto can not even be displayed in its entirety on your Eizo (which barely covers Adobe RGB 1998). Export all images for printing to Adobe RGB 1998 whether using our system or printing to OEM color inks and your life will begin to superlatize! ProPhoto has an internal Gamma of 1.0 which is scientific gamma related to sensors. Humans need contrast to see light to dark in a perceptually logical manner and even Lightroom has to convert ProPhoto to Gamma 2.20 in order to deal with this phenomena. ProPhoto RGB is like the container of Space infinitum. We know its out there but we can’t actually see the ends and have only an inkling of the beginning. Adobe RGB 1998 is a bit more like Earth and our atmosphere and all we need to breath, make babies, live and die happily. Anything more would be greedy and really unattainable. How’s that for a description on ProPhoto that probably everyone else will disagree with. But, if you can’t see it or print it, why use it other than to satisfy a hypothetical? It’s best for use with raw images and that’s where it belongs and should remain. Once you hit the real world of imaging and printing - got to stay within your means…

YOU Must adhere to our Gamma 2.20 workflow as outlines in the New Piezography Manual - or the output will be disrupted.

Now that your display is calibrated - you can use Soft Proof profiles to pre-visualize (and that takes some getting used to). These work best adjacent to a dimming 5000k viewing booth. You can get an uncanny match.


#3

[QUOTE=jon;7909]This is not a profile that you use at all. This is purely a profile that your operating system uses in reference to the calibration of your Eizo using the Eizo Color Navigator software. Your operating system loads this for use in communicating to the display.

Your images can be converted to grayscale but must be converted using the Gamma 2.20 profile and you can see how to setup Photoshop to do this in this small movie here: http://www.piezography.com/PiezoPress/easy-to-use/

Never use ProPhoto profiles unless you wish to image in a theoretical workspace that is too large for any printing system that uses pigment or dye ink. ProPhoto can not even be displayed in its entirety on your Eizo (which barely covers Adobe RGB 1998). Export all images for printing to Adobe RGB 1998 whether using our system or printing to OEM color inks and your life will begin to superlatize! ProPhoto has an internal Gamma of 1.0 which is scientific gamma related to sensors. Humans need contrast to see light to dark in a perceptually logical manner and even Lightroom has to convert ProPhoto to Gamma 2.20 in order to deal with this phenomena. ProPhoto RGB is like the container of Space infinitum. We know its out there but we can’t actually see the ends and have only an inkling of the beginning. Adobe RGB 1998 is a bit more like Earth and our atmosphere and all we need to breath, make babies, live and die happily. Anything more would be greedy and really unattainable. How’s that for a description on ProPhoto that probably everyone else will disagree with. But, if you can’t see it or print it, why use it other than to satisfy a hypothetical? It’s best for use with raw images and that’s where it belongs and should remain. Once you hit the real world of imaging and printing - got to stay within your means…

YOU Must adhere to our Gamma 2.20 workflow as outlines in the New Piezography Manual - or the output will be disrupted.

Now that your display is calibrated - you can use Soft Proof profiles to pre-visualize (and that takes some getting used to). These work best adjacent to a dimming 5000k viewing booth. You can get an uncanny match.[/QUOTE]

Hi Jon and thanks for reply.

Seems i may have miss used the term profile, i was referring to the profile created when calibration the monitor using the Eizo Color Navigator software, of which you can create a number of.

Your explanation of Prophoto is informative, but you end with saying it should only be used for raw! Which brings me back to my original question.

Would i create and load monitor calibration profile that is set for prophoto for editing raw images, but once exported change the monitor profile to piezography specific monitor profile ?

i always work in 2.2 gamma so that is not a problem.

When creating the monitor profile for piezography will i need to change or set any of the options i mentioned in OP?

thanks


#4

If you are going to use Color Navigator you can create a number of calibration based upon different settings. You could even make one for editing images that will be displayed on websites. To switch is usually accomplished on the fly in less than a minute - and it usually automates the loading of the display ICC into your OS.

If you need to load the profile manually you will also need to select the calibration in Color Navigator. So check and see if switching calibrations in Color Navigator automates that for you. If it does not - there is probably a setting you can change.

Your Eizo is incapable of displaying ProPhoto gamut. No display can yet. It barely covers Adobe RGB 1998. Lightroom actually uses most of Adobe RGB 1998 to redisplay back to you - so I think that you should calibrate to Adobe RGB 1998. That’s my opinion.

A print calibration is very low in terms of luminosity as you are trying to get the display to be low in contrast as is ink on paper. So instead you may wish to use a calibration that is super bright (like 140L or something) for imaging for the web or for others who may look at your work on a display rather than on paper.

Am I confusing things worse??


#5

No, that all seems good.

I should have specific print calibration, plus one for image editing, both of them in adobeRgb and probably one in srgb for web viewing, though i do have a second monitor i could use for this.

What i am not sure of is the workflow from raw to piezography print as far monitor brightness is concerned?

If i intend an image to be for print would monitor brightness of cmd80 right the start and only change this if i want to create an image for screen viewing?

Seems to me that it would be to start at brightness of cmd80 so could get the best shadow and highlight detail from the raw file?


#6

Yes, I work in Lightroom with my Piezo K7 80c calibration. And when I am adjacent to my GTI booth that is also set to the same illumination, I use soft proofs in Lightroom.


#7

Great sound good.

So what about the extra settings in color navigator when creating a profile, do i need to set these or just leave as?

Under Gamet choice:
Gamet clipping = off (is this correct?)

Set the target black = unset (can chose from 0.2 upto 3.5)

Under Tone Curve
Priority = Standard (The others are Grey Balance, Contrast)

thanks


#8

Gamut I do native in Color Navigator and it comes up with just under Adobe RGB 1998. Our Eizos can only do about 98% of Adobe RGB.

target black is useful for computing contrast to match an individual ink and paper. Sometimes you can set the L and the contrast ratio. You could divide the actual L values of the dMax of the paper by the paper itself (dMin). But then you would have to do that with each combo. The Soft Proof does it for you perceptually.

I use Gray Balance as the undertone curve because I prefer to have a neutral display.